A prominent name in law enforcement is not in favor of President Trump’s extreme law and order measures during a period of heightened social unrest, namely the use of the U.S. military to quiet protesters.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="“I don’t support that at all, and I don’t think anyone else does. It’s not needed,” former NYPD commissioner Bill Bratton said on Yahoo Finance’s The First Trade, referring to the potential use of the military by Trump on America’s streets. That’s saying a lot seeing as Bratton gained a reputation as being tough on crime — employing a controversial law enforcement style known as broken windows theory — and gaining results in the process.” data-reactid=”17″>“I don’t support that at all, and I don’t think anyone else does. It’s not needed,” former NYPD commissioner Bill Bratton said on Yahoo Finance’s The First Trade, referring to the potential use of the military by Trump on America’s streets. That’s saying a lot seeing as Bratton gained a reputation as being tough on crime — employing a controversial law enforcement style known as broken windows theory — and gaining results in the process.

Bratton was the New York City police commissioner from 1994 to 1996 and then returned from 2014 to 2016. He had a stint as commissioner of the Boston police department from 1993 to 1994 and as the LAPD chief from 2002 to 2009.

Bill Bratton pictured while Officers of the NYPD's newly-rebuilt Strategic Response Group conducted drills on Randall's Island -on December 16, 2015 in New York. Credit: Dennis Van Tine/MediaPunch/IPXBill Bratton pictured while Officers of the NYPD's newly-rebuilt Strategic Response Group conducted drills on Randall's Island -on December 16, 2015 in New York. Credit: Dennis Van Tine/MediaPunch/IPX
Bill Bratton pictured while Officers of the NYPD’s newly-rebuilt Strategic Response Group conducted drills on Randall’s Island -on December 16, 2015 in New York. Credit: Dennis Van Tine/MediaPunch/IPX

Added Bratton, “In terms of bringing in Federal troops which is what the president, I think is thinking about, we did that in the 1960s with tragic results and a tremendous number of deaths in those riots. You don’t want U.S. military who are basically trained to fight a war to come into American cities. That’s not what we’re about, and fortunately that’s not what we are going to see.”

Trump has continued to rally around a theme this month of “law and order”, noting numerous times that state governors need to “dominate the streets” to get racial injustice protests under wraps. In a show of force, the National Guard was called in to tear gas protestors so Trump could do a photo-op in front of a church nearby the White House.

“If a city or a state refuses to take the actions that are necessary to defend the life and property of their residents, then I will deploy the United States military and quickly resolve the problem for them,” Trump said earlier this month. Trump’s call has been met with rebuke by prominent current and former members of the armed forces.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Brian Sozzi is an editor-at-large and co-anchor of The First Trade at Yahoo Finance. Follow Sozzi on Twitter @BrianSozzi and on LinkedIn.” data-reactid=”33″>Brian Sozzi is an editor-at-large and co-anchor of The First Trade at Yahoo Finance. Follow Sozzi on Twitter @BrianSozzi and on LinkedIn.

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